Sunday, June 8, 2008

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Iguazú

Paraguay, Brazil, Argentina
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Iguazú National Park, located in Argentina near its borders with Brazil and Paraguay, contains remnants of the highly endangered Paranaense Rain Forest. Isolated from other rain forests by natural barriers, the Paranaense developed a distinct and highly diverse ecosystem with thousands of species of mammals, birds, reptiles, and amphibians unique to the area. The famous Iguazú Falls are located within the boundaries of the National Park and are shared by Argentina and Brazil.

Between 1973 and 2003, dramatic changes to the landscape occurred in this region. In 1973 the forested area spread across the borders of the three nations. By 2003, however, large areas of the forest in Paraguay and Brazil, and smaller amounts in Argentina, had been converted to other forms of land cover, creating a mosaic of differently colored land use areas. Note the variation in land cover patterns among the different countries - reflections of different land use polices
and practices. View detailed information

5 comments:

Anonymous said...

Different policy decisions have different results!!

meron said...

well written, keep up the good job!

Rinaldi said...

Congratulations on presenting the historical change of the landscape and consequently the climate

I have fixes for this historic.
This is a binational Park, with two administration (Brasilian and Argentine).
The brasilian side is the size of 185252,5 ha and the Argentine side is 67000 ha approximately.
The colonization in the Brasilian side started really at the end of the decade of 40. In the Argetine side started at the beginning of the eighties.
Paraguayan side of the deforestation began in the beginning of the decade and 70.
Looking for a proportion of time scale we see that the change is similar in Brazil and Argentina, but in different periods of time.
In Brazil and Paraguay to replace the natural landscape by monocultures of soy, corn and wheat. In Argentina by large areas of pine and tea.

Anonymous said...

Congratulations on presenting the historical change of the landscape and consequently the climate

I have fixes for this historic.
This is a binational Park, with two administration (Brasilian and Argentine).
The brasilian side is the size of 185252,5 ha and the Argentine side is 67000 ha approximately.
The colonization in the Brasilian side started really at the end of the decade of 40. In the Argetine side started at the beginning of the eighties.
Paraguayan side of the deforestation began in the beginning of the decade and 70.
Looking for a proportion of time scale we see that the change is similar in Brazil and Argentina, but in different periods of time.
In Brazil and Paraguay to replace the natural landscape by monocultures of soy, corn and wheat. In Argentina by large areas of pine and tea.

Anonymous said...

Congratulations on presenting the historical change of the landscape and consequently the climate

I have fixes for this historic.
This is a binational Park, with two administration (Brasilian and Argentine).
The brasilian side is the size of 185252,5 ha and the Argentine side is 67000 ha approximately.
The colonization in the Brasilian side started really at the end of the decade of 40. In the Argetine side started at the beginning of the eighties.
Paraguayan side of the deforestation began in the beginning of the decade and 70.
Looking for a proportion of time scale we see that the change is similar in Brazil and Argentina, but in different periods of time.
In Brazil and Paraguay to replace the natural landscape by monocultures of soy, corn and wheat. In Argentina by large areas of pine and tea.